A Practical Navigator for the Internet Economy

Smart Radios Enabling Shared Wireless Broadband

an Examination of the Implications of FCC Policy:  Wisps to Google, to the National “Carriers”
& Wells: Alternative Pathway in Kansas City (part 2)

We examine new FCC wireless rule makings with very positive implications for wisps and cellular bandwidth/  Here is our current situation” The Report and Order and Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking adopted by the Commission on April 17, 2015 established a new Citizens Broadband Radio Service for shared wireless broadband use of the 3550-3700 MHz band (3.5 GHz Band). Rules governing the Citizens Broadband Radio Service are found in Part 96 of the Commission’s rules.

In an interview Fred Goldstein describes for us the ultimate maturation of the smart radio process that was discussed as early as 2006 -2007.  In this realm radios are now - at long last - able to make far more efficient use of available spectrum than heretofore possible. 

This issue continues our earlier report on the impact  of programs designed as an "alternative  path"  by William Wells.

 

And in Related News

We provide basic information from Rick Usher and Google about its 3.5 ghz broadband wireless trials in Kansas City.

From arch econ  - a brief discussion about - Who Controls the Turf in the Placement of Micro Wireless Facilities?  The context is  “Ohio General Assembly passes bill restricting the  right of municipalities to regulate pole placement of "micro-wireless facilities.”"

Matt Larsen offers a brief evaluation  of the 3.5 ghz spectrum.

From William Wells a progress report on his efforts to build and alternative path for education and job training in Kansas City.

And finally our Photo pdf bibliography of 171 “books” to date,

Executive Sumary and Contents of this issue are found here:

 

Executive Summary

We examine new FCC wireless rule makings with very positive implications for wisps and cellular bandwidth/  Here is our current situation” The Report and Order and Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking adopted by the Commission on April 17, 2015 established a new Citizens Broadband Radio Service for shared wireless broadband use of the 3550-3700 MHz band (3.5 GHz Band). Rules governing the Citizens Broadband Radio Service are found in Part 96 of the Commission’s rules.

In an interview Fred Goldstein describes for us the ultimate maturation of the smart radio process that was discussed as early as 2006 -2007.  In this realm radios are now - at long last - able to make far more efficient use of available spectrum than heretofore possible.  They do this by checking in with sophisticated databases that give them permission to operate and set the parameters by which they are allowed to operate.

We also show why the CBRS service not only will provide extra capacity for some WISP systems but is also a crucial underlying factor for the ability of LTE as a cell phone supporting system to operate. The interview closes by making an evolutionary analogy with the environmentally-tailored means of radio operation that, in many respects, is highly similar to where the development of Recursive Internet Architecture presently is.  In addition to CBRS rules for use of 3.5 ghz spectrum are being developed and Google - now unfortunately backing off its plans to lay fiber in many new cities - is in a group called WinnForum making significant investment in wireless trials to develop an alternative wireless broadband service.

Fred describes how LTE could be used by these new services, with new bandwidth categories known as GAA, virtually unlicensed, and PAL, priority access licenses for reserved bandwidth.  It appears that radios meeting the technical requirements will be able to use the appropriate spectrum with having to pay exorbitant fees and that incumbents’ past tendency to engage in license purchases that they never use (spectrum banking) will be very likely eliminated.  

The processes involved are complex but the radios essentially register themselves in Spectrum Authorization System databases which grant them authorization to transmit on appropriate frequencies.  Part of the CBRS band involves naval radar.  Fred explains how essentially intelligent radios sign up with special databases that authorize service areas and make territory of operation should any WISP be within about 100 miles of the sea coast. He also points out how some radios are supposed to operate at 3650 MHZ but that no 3650 licenses have been given out since 2015 and the idea is that they are all supposed to become CBSD’s which means that some vendors using no compliant tech may have to change or find that their product can’t operate on the CBSD band.  
Fred then moves on to a discussion of cellular bandwidth.

“Now one of the odd things is that the big boys: namely ATT and Verizon are not, it is thought, all that interested in buying PALs, [where users have more  privileges than at the  GAA level.] They just want to play GAA because it is cheaper.”  Fred continues: “the consequence of all this is that in WinnForum there is some controversy over the GAA rules of operation where it turns out that LTE is pretty good at protecting other LTE signals.  This is time division LTE that is TTD of the single-channel kind which is what you would use on CBRS which has a transmit and receive time based on a GPS transmit and receive clock.”

Fred’s explanation of how the system will work involves some complex choreography.  

COOK Report:  In other words, the CBRS Alliance functions like an orchestra playing under the guidance of a conductor?  Fred: yes.  Fred then continues to explain how cellular bandwidth standards evolved in the 1970s and concludes that devices began to evolve rapidly while the standards could not keep up the pace.

Fred: TCP/IP effectively enabled the flat architecture of the ARPAnet to expand form 200  nodes to over  two billion.  For a while it was thought that the imposition firewalls could supply security against outside attack but with distributed denial of service attacks we soon saw a problem with the old architecture where Firewalls prevent the bad stuff from getting in but both DDoS and DoS prevents the good stuff from even reaching the firewall.

The LTE folk are now using technology to heavily modularize things so that, if you have a narrow scope and a narrow purpose, you and a gazilion other individuals will have room to play. The greater the modularity, the less likely that something hooks into something else and pulls the structure down.  And thinking along these lines, one has to conclude that RINA does something pretty similar in a modularization of Internet operations.

What RINA does is start with a different approach. RINA is not a fixed protocol stack. There is a single layer mechanism that recurses. The result is that the software is simple and the protocol mechanism includes authentication and encryption as optional functions.  There isn't one flat network layer, with one address space, that reaches everyone. The ability to connect to anything, at any layer, can be controlled by an authentication process.  It is many individual DIFs (Distributed IPC Facilities) and so each DIF passes traffic to other DIFs based upon authentication.  It does this with no global IP address space and it does it where the common identifier is the application name - that is the name of the DIF and there can be many many DIFs because addressing is a local function only.  
 
Only the application name is sort of global and even then it is only global in the context of whom you are dealing with. There is no central authority needed.  The newly licensed spectrum works because the smart radios involved can break it up into many interlocking modulated components in the same way that RINA works by modularization and in this instance by recursive modularization.  In Europe the Irati and Pristine projects have built test code for the entire architecture.  What is now needed is the relatively straightforward process of turning test into production code.

Contents


Introduction - the 3.5 GHz Band / Citizens Broadband Radio Service Rule Making 12-354             p. 6

Verizon’s FiOS Fillings in Boston                                 p. 8

SAS and ESC Give Access to GAA or PAL                             p, 11

Who Gets Which Grain Leg?                                     p. 13

Some Controversy over the Role of the SAS                          p. 14

Devices Evolve Rapidly While the Protocol itself Does Not                p. 15

When Firewalls are No Longer Effective                             p. 16

RINA Starts with a Different Approach                              p. 17

RINA Offers VPN Security                                      p. 19

Software Mediated Spectrum Sharing                              p. 20

Google Adopts Kansas City for 3.5 ghz Trials                    p. 21

Who Controls the Turf in the Placement of Micro Wireless Facilities?      p. 26

Matt Larsen, CEO of Vistabeam, Evaluates Usefulness of the New 3.5 ghz Spectrum                                                p. 29

aSTEAM Village Progress Report                         p.31

Photo pdf Bibliography Updated:  12/06/2016             p.34